Category Archives: Practice and Recovery

Violin Technique?

“In instrumental music, the relationship of the percussive elements to those of the purely singing sound is analogous to that of the consonants and vowels in speech and song.”

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Violin Technique?

“In instrumental music, the relationship of the percussive elements to those of the purely singing sound is analogous to that of the consonants and vowels in speech and song.”

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Alan Balter And The Die Cast Machine

The power of a liberal arts education (thanks Michelle)

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Alan Balter And The Die Cast Machine

The power of a liberal arts education (thanks Michelle)

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Managing the Fingers

I have already delved into the kinesiology of playing the clarinet and some of the aspects of movement and stability.

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Managing the Fingers

I have already delved into the kinesiology of playing the clarinet and some of the aspects of movement and stability.

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Kinesiology of the Clarinet

Kinesiology as it relates to the clarinet involves every aspect of practice and performance. By definition kinesiology is the science dealing with the interrelationship of the physiological processes and anatomy of the human body with respect to movement. Movement of the fingers in relation to the fingers and the key’s on the clarinet involves constant attention to the height of the fingers in relation to the keys and the flexibility needed to make the connections with a sense of interconnectedness.

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Kinesiology of the Clarinet

Kinesiology as it relates to the clarinet involves every aspect of practice and performance. By definition kinesiology is the science dealing with the interrelationship of the physiological processes and anatomy of the human body with respect to movement. Movement of the fingers in relation to the fingers and the key’s on the clarinet involves constant attention to the height of the fingers in relation to the keys and the flexibility needed to make the connections with a sense of interconnectedness.

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Finger Positions

I am looking forward to pulling out another old warhorse, the Rossini Theme and Variations and give the fingers a good workout. Arpeggios, here I come!

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Finger Positions

I am looking forward to pulling out another old warhorse, the Rossini Theme and Variations and give the fingers a good workout. Arpeggios, here I come!

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Rose Etudes and some finger/interpretation basics

From the Russianoff Clarinet Method, a statment by Leon… “Do no assume that the ligature must always be placed in the same position 9 the usual:  slightly below the scribed line on the mouth piece).” “In short, trust trial and

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Rose Etudes and some finger/interpretation basics

From the Russianoff Clarinet Method, a statment by Leon… “Do no assume that the ligature must always be placed in the same position 9 the usual:  slightly below the scribed line on the mouth piece).” “In short, trust trial and

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What happens when an accompanist is not just an accompanist?

am involved in a wonderful discussion about the role of the soloist and the accompanist in the creation of musical works. Dr. Kennith Freeman and I are engaged in an internet discussion about a recent experience in Houston, Texas when we performed together for the first time. The event was called “Mosaic” and we collaborated across the miles in the United States before we met, each with different ideas and ideologies about how a performance should go.

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What happens when an accompanist is not just an accompanist?

am involved in a wonderful discussion about the role of the soloist and the accompanist in the creation of musical works. Dr. Kennith Freeman and I are engaged in an internet discussion about a recent experience in Houston, Texas when we performed together for the first time. The event was called “Mosaic” and we collaborated across the miles in the United States before we met, each with different ideas and ideologies about how a performance should go.

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Working with Tonguing Technique

Leon Russianoff, a clarinetist who taught at the Juilliard School and the Manhattan School of Music, died Sunday at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital. He was 73 years old and lived in Manhattan. He died after a brief illness, his family said. Born in Brooklyn in 1916, Mr. Russianoff began studying the clarinet at the age of 14 and later won a scholarship to study with Simeon Bellison, then the first clarinetist of the New York Philharmonic. He started teaching professionally in 1938, when he graduated from the City College of New York.

In addition to his positions at the Manhattan School, where he taught for 35 years, and the Juilliard School, where he had been on the faculty since 1970, Mr. Russianoff also taught at Teachers College, Brooklyn College, Queens College, the State University College at Purchase, Catholic University and the 92d Street Y’s music school. His students included Stanley Drucker, the first clarinetist of the New York Philharmonic, and the soloist Charles Neidich.

Mr. Russianoff is survived by his wife, Penelope; a daughter, Sylvia, of Philadelphia; a son, Charles, of Royal Palm Beach, Fla., and two grandchildren.

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Working with Tonguing Technique

Leon Russianoff, a clarinetist who taught at the Juilliard School and the Manhattan School of Music, died Sunday at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital. He was 73 years old and lived in Manhattan. He died after a brief illness, his family said. Born in Brooklyn in 1916, Mr. Russianoff began studying the clarinet at the age of 14 and later won a scholarship to study with Simeon Bellison, then the first clarinetist of the New York Philharmonic. He started teaching professionally in 1938, when he graduated from the City College of New York.

In addition to his positions at the Manhattan School, where he taught for 35 years, and the Juilliard School, where he had been on the faculty since 1970, Mr. Russianoff also taught at Teachers College, Brooklyn College, Queens College, the State University College at Purchase, Catholic University and the 92d Street Y’s music school. His students included Stanley Drucker, the first clarinetist of the New York Philharmonic, and the soloist Charles Neidich.

Mr. Russianoff is survived by his wife, Penelope; a daughter, Sylvia, of Philadelphia; a son, Charles, of Royal Palm Beach, Fla., and two grandchildren.

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The Healing Power of Music

I hope this empowers everyone to look within themselves and begin to heal.

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The Healing Power of Music

I hope this empowers everyone to look within themselves and begin to heal.

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